Safeguarding and child protection

At Eden, we take safeguarding very seriously and all our staff understand that “safeguarding is everyone’s business and everyone’s responsibility”. The school works closely with the Bolton Safeguarding Children’s Board and related safeguarding teams and takes full part in multi-agency training organised by them.

All adults who regularly work on our site are required to undergo a Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check to prevent unsuitable people from working with students. All visitors are closely supervised when on site.

Our staff are trained to be vigilant for all kinds of safeguarding concerns, including bullying, online safety, emotional or other abuse or extremist behaviour. We have clear procedures in place where any potential safeguarding concerns are identified and appropriate action taken. Where a student is deemed to be at significant risk and we need to involve other agencies, we share information with other public bodies such as Children’s Social Care. Where information is shared, we work within the agreed local information sharing protocols to make sure that information is shared in line with local and national rules.

Where safeguarding concerns are raised that relate to any adults in school, we work closely with the Local Authority Designated Officer (LADO) to make sure we follow the correct procedures, and ensure all concerns are investigated and followed up appropriately.

Our students are taught about how to keep themselves safe and about what to do if they have any concerns. We also teach them and display information about local and national charities (e.g. NSPCC) that they can contact for confidential advice

Mrs Bushra Kamal is our Designated Senior Person for safeguarding. Mr Mo Mangera is lead governor for child protection.

Click here to download our safeguarding and child protection policy
Click here to download our anti-bullying policy

Online Safety – Advice for Parents

Whilst our school has comprehensive safeguarding arrangements in place to ensure our pupils’ online safety, it is equally as important for parents to talk to their children about online safety and monitor their internet usage at home, using age-appropriate parental controls to restrict their access to unsavoury material. Parental controls can be activated on home broadband, search engines, YouTube, mobile phones and games consoles.

Whilst it may not always be easy to talk to your child about challenging issues such as sexting, cyber bullying, and pornography, if you are open and honest with them about the dangers they may encounter online, it may encourage them to confide in you in the future. If you are concerned that your child is being secretive or spending too much time online, it may be worth moving their computer into a communal family area so that you can keep an eye on them.

You should encourage your child to act responsibility online, and treat others as they would wish to be treated. You should also warn your child that they should never hide behind an anonymous user name to make unkind comments, or say something they would be reluctant to repeat during face-to-face interactions. Remind your child that the comments they make and the pictures and videos they post online may end up having a wider audience than they anticipated – and even if they delete them, there’s no guarantee that someone hasn’t already saved, downloaded or taken a screen shot of their post.

Children under the age of 13 should not be using social networking sites like Facebook, Instagram and Tumblr – this is stipulated in the sites’ terms and conditions – but it easy for them to set up an account by claiming to be older than they actually are. If your child does have a Facebook or other social media account, it is important to encourage them to use enhanced privacy settings, so that only their friends are able to search for them and see what they are posting. Warn your child that they must never accept friend requests from strangers or people they don’t know very well. You should also encourage your child to accept you, or a trusted friend/relative, as their “friend” or “follower,” as this will enable you to monitor – at least to some extent – their online posts, conversations, and the friends they are choosing to accept.

Parents should also be aware that content filters may not always work if a child is using public Wi-Fi, so it is important to ensure their access to unprotected Wi-Fi is limited.

If your child has been targeted online, the website Internet Matters offers detailed advice about who to report the incident to. Links to other websites that you may find useful are included below:

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